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July 23, 2016

In our tropical kitchen this morning our two newest tropical storms, Frank and Georgette will both spin up to hurricanes and himicanes this weekend and if they follow the plan they will head harmlessly west as the other 5 storms this year.  Frank’s path takes is fairly close to the cape and I’d expect some cloudiness and perhaps a sprinkle or two as it passes WNW.  Estelle is now history.
Tropical waves” there is one in transit in the Atlantic, one moving through the Caribbean and one in the jungles of Central America this morning.

 

 

Tropical Archives

2014

2015

 
 

 

2016 Tropical Storms

Click on a storm name for details and graphics

Agatha

TS

6/1-6/5

Blas

Cat 3

6/3-6/7

 

Celia

Cat 1

7-9-7/15

 

 

Darby

Cat 2

7/13-7/21

 

 

Estelle

TS

7/16-7/23

 

Frank

TS

7/22-

 

 

 

Georgette

TS

7/23

 

 

Howard

 

Ivette

 

Javier

 

Kayl

 

Lester

 

Madeline

 

Newton

 

Orlene

 

 

Pains

 

 

Roslyn

 

Saymor

 

Tina

 

Virgil

  Winffred   Xavier   Yolanda  

 

Zeke

 

 

Pacific Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook from National Hurricane center Miami florida

 
 
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What is a Tropical wave and where do they come from?
Normally a tropical wave starts off as a sand storm in the Sahara Desert. Especially in the summer months there is a significant temperature gradient between the hot desert and the cooler waters along the Gulf of Guinea Coast.  So this hot, dust and sand filled wind starts moving west and developing into a trough of low. The wave, now bow shaped, is now being transported by the African Eastern Jet which moves east west across the Atlantic. 
A new tropical wave departs western North Africa about every 2-4 days between April and November, with about 60-65 waves per year, on average.
In the Atlantic 85% of all their major hurricanes have their origins traceable to these African waves and about 60% of all tropical storm and cat 1-2 hurricanes are spawned by these waves. 
Those that make it across the Atlantic and the Caribbean without tropical development (a tropical storm or hurricane) normally cross Central America and end up in the Eastern Pacific basin where they looking for a low to stimulate in the waters warmer than 80 degrees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In our tropical kitchen this morning that low that is west of Zihuatanejo, parked on the ITCZ, Monsoon Trough, has now been designated 93 Echo.  Not much has changed in the forecast with only a minimal chance of developing into anything topical.

          Off in the Atlantic there are 3 tropical waves in transit with one just entering the jungles of Central America this morning.